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How to get hair dye out of carpet

Tara Hall by Tara Hall

With more and more of us shunning the hairdressers in favour of at-home methods, it’s no wonder that hair dye stains are becoming increasingly common. If you’re struggling to get hair dye out of your carpet, then take a look at this helpful guide.

As with most stains, acting quickly increases the chances of removing it. Dried on stains are much harder to get rid of.

Before attempting any kind of cleaning, you should consult your carpet care guide. Different materials and carpet types react in different ways so it’s important to check the following methods are appropriate and won’t damage your flooring.

Soak up any excess
First thing’s first, soak up as much excess dye as possible with a clean, dry cloth. Always dab your carpet, don’t rub. Rubbing damages the carpet fibres as well as potentially working the stain in further.

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Mix washing up liquid and white vinegar
Next, make your solution. Add one tbsp of washing up liquid and white vinegar to two cups of warm water.

Soak a cloth in the solution and dab the area. Lift any excess product with a clean, dry cloth.

Apply cold water
Apply cold water with a clean cloth and absorb any excess.

Apply rubbing alcohol
The next step is to sponge with rubbing alcohol in the same way as above, removing any excess with a clean, dry cloth. Then repeat the above cold water step.

Mix washing up liquid and ammonia
Now it’s time now to make another solution. Mix one tbsp of washing up liquid with one tbsp of ammonia and two cups of water. Please note, ammonia may damage wool carpets. Blot the area at five minute intervals for 30 minutes, applying more solution each time. Then repeat the cold water step.

Hopefully this will have greatly reduced the stain, but for more troublesome marks try the next step.

Apply hydrogen peroxide
Applying hydrogen peroxide to the area should be done with care, and only after thoroughly reading your carpet care instructions. Not all carpets are bleach cleanable. If yours is, use a pipette to apply the hydrogen peroxide. You may need to repeat this process a couple of times.

Finally, thoroughly clean the area with cold water and blot up any excess. You can then vacuum the area and perk up any fibres.

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