Hillarys become a designer entry - Rich Turner

Hillarys become a designer

finalists announced

Sarah Quilliam by Sarah Quilliam

The initial stage of judging is complete. Now take a first look at the 10 talents going through to the finals of our Become a Hillarys designer competition.

Back in September 2015, we set an open challenge for up-coming creatives to design a Scandinavian-themed fabric for a Roller blind. Entrants needed to consider the evolution of Scandi style, current trends, and how their final piece would sit in today’s marketplace.

Find out about the 10 finalists who best met the competition brief below. The winner is being announced on the 22nd of January.

Anna Page

Hillarys become a designer entry - Anna Page

 “Modern Scandinavian interior design is spacious, natural and fresh looking, which I wanted to reflect in my entry.

“My piece is based on a repeated pattern of 3 meadows, each adorned with a plant motif. The colours – ochre brown, duck-egg blue and moss green - are tranquil and trending for SS16, so made a natural fit for my natural design.” - Anna Page

Charlotte Louise Holden

Hillarys become a designer entry - Charlotte Holden

 “Much of Scandinavian design reflects the ideal of lagom: a Swedish word translating as just the right amount. It’s about balancing simplicity with function.

“My design reflects this tradition, but also draws upon recent colour and pattern trends. I’ve used different-sized horizontal and vertical stripes, combined with a white, grey, blue and green palette. This choice is inspired by natural fibres and grains – it’s my bid to bring the feel of the outdoors into the home.” - Charlotte Louise Holden

Ches Young

Hillarys become a designer entry - Ches Young

 “The use of light is very important in any Scandinavian home, so I decided to use earthy tones in my design to fit with the ideal of a bright, clean and pure interior. I opted for refined neutrals and muted pastels, as these are part of a timeless story of light and space in the home. My pattern references Brutalist architecture and graphic ornamentation.” - Ches Young

Emma Quinn

Hillarys become a designer entry - Emma Quinn

 “SS16’s focus on ceremonial geometrics inspired my design. I came up with a pattern that blends triangles and diamonds. The result is striking at first, but there are many subtleties that reveal themselves on further inspection.” - Emma Quinn

Madeline Farbon

Hillarys become a designer entry - Maddy Farbon

 “Researching SS16 trends, I discovered a move towards complex fresh and bright Scandinavian design, as well as more traditional block colours. The versatile geometrics of my design are inspired by this combination. This accent piece will complement the soft, minimal colour schemes so common in Scandinavian homes.” - Madeline Farbon

Metka Hiti

Hillarys become a designer entry - Metka Hiti

 “My research into Scandinavian design helped me compose this floral pattern. I sketched flowers and leaves and used lots of dots and short brush strokes to achieve a Nordic feel." - Metka Hiti

Naomi France

Hillarys become a designer entry - Naomi France

 “I wanted to represent the subtle simplicity and beauty of Scandinavian architecture through the language of print. The strong shapes of buildings have always influenced me – in this case I took a bold and experimental approach." - Naomi France

Anchor

Tamara Emmanuel

Hillarys become a designer entry - Tara Emanuel

 “Scandinavian design is identified by its principles of calm minimalism, simplicity and functionality. My research into contemporary Scandi style revealed a trend towards grey and copper tones and wooden, natural textures. My work brings together the feel of a raw, natural texture and the colours of SS16.” - Tamara Emmanuel

Rich Turner

Hillarys become a designer entry - Rich Turner

 “My work, Soraya, takes its direction from the traditional, contemporary and cultural elements that have influenced Scandinavian design over the years.

“The print stays faithful to Scandinavian-design principles, such as ease of mind and calm. It offers a muted sentiment, with the ochre effect against a gentle background appearing as though looking at the design by candlelight.” - Rich Turner

Tori Mclean

Hillarys become a designer entry - Tori McLean

 “Contemporary Scandinavian design often uses clean lines and white spaces to offset block colour or bright highlights. The long-standing tradition of homecrafts (including weave and embroidery) has made stripes a perennial favourite. This love of line has filtered into a growing trend for wireframe design.

“I wanted to capture the feeling of the wireframe trend and Scandinavia’s embroidery tradition in my print. My motif looks hand-drawn to provide this sense of artisanship.” - Tori Mclean

 

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